Bolt's Antique Tool Museum - TLC0026-TLC0050
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view TLC001 through TLC0025     /     view TLC0026 through TLC0050     /     view TLC0051 through TLC0075

 

view TLC0076 through TLC0100     /     view TLC0101 through TLC0125 

 

TLC0050  
This tool is 81/2” long, has two arms that are hinged at one end and they have set screws at the other end, There is a sliding assy. that can move up and down the two arms. This sliding assy. has a piece of steel, 1” square, that can be rotated for different settings. There is also 438A stamped into it.

Can anyone tell us what this tool was used for?

Positively Identified
8/29/2015 Joseph H.
Possibly used for tightening the packing nuts on steam engine. Valve rods and main rods were different sizes thus requiring an adjustable tool. Many of the old packing nut setups just had slots or holes in the outer radius to hook a tool in. Some of those wrenches were just a hook with a pin on one side. Like your website.
11/26/2015 Paul
Western Electric Model 438A Telephone Spanner Wrench. This wrench was used to tighten and remove the handset and receiver parts on a Western Electric Model 202 telephone and possibly other models.
 
TLC0049  
This tool is 51/2” long and it has a hook with a handle.  There is a forge mark of a small anchor.

Can anybody share some information on this tool?

Positively Identified
6/17/2013 Ray
 TLC0049 is a hook pick to clean horses hoofs. You will see these in most farrier tool boxes. 
3/18/2014 Dale
TLC0049 is a hoof pick as stated, the "anchor" is the trademark of NORTH-JUDD MFC. known for their SPURS.
AWSOME WEB SITE
 
 
TLC0048  
It is a cast iron wrench, 12 ½ inches long.  It has 16367 stamped on one side of the handle, it has a 1” opening, with a jaw 1 ¼ “ wide.

Can anyone share info on this tool?
 
 
TLC0047  
It is a multi purpose wrench that is 7 inches long and has MF126 STD cast into one side. There are three hexagon openings with 13/16”, 7/8”, & 3/4” sizes and one square 5/16” opening.

Can anyone share info about this tool?
5/3/2013 William
My father was a fireman in Detroit and used a similar tool for fire hydrants although all of the hydrants I remember used a 5 point head I do remember seeing one on the fire truck that had multiple heads as such and the 5/16 on the end would be for the drain plug on the hydrant which had to be drained after use in order to prevent freezing.
6/4/2013 Donald
TLC0047 appears to be the wrench that came with a new McCormick horse drawn alfalfa mower.  It had a pitman and a bar and a wrench much like this one was used to repair and adjust the various moving or movable parts. We had four of thes machines on our ranch in the 1930"s and 40's.
6/4/2013 James
TLC0047 looks very much like an oldtime combination wrench which tightened the nuts on oxy/acetylene bottle regulators, and also served to open and close the acetylene valve with the small opening.
 
TLC0046  
It is a cast iron wrench 11 inches long and has the numbers, 1329 3x4 cast into it. One end is a socket with a 1 1/8 inch opening. The other end is open-ended with a 13/16 square opening, also has a hexagon that is also 1 1/8 opening.

Can anyone help us with some info on this tool?
 
 
TLC0045  
Over all length is 12 inches.  It is a three piece assembly.  All three pieces have a thumb screw.  The piece on the right is fixed to the rod, and has a hole cast into it that is 9/16" diameter.  The center piece can slide on the rod and can swivel in a ball socket.  It can also hold a piece of flat stock ¾" wide and 3/16" thick. The arm on the left has a 3/16" hole in it.

Can anyone identify this tool?

Positively Identified
6/4/2013 Jane
Looks like it holds a file for saws.
6/4/2013 Richard
The device is part of either a hand saw or chainsaw filling "guide".
 
TLC0044a  

This is a very large open end combination wrench made by Williams.
The open end sizes are 3 5/8” and 3 3/16”, with a overall length of 37 inches.

Can anyone tell us what these tools are used for?

Positively Identified

5/2/2013 Ed
Locomotives
5/2/2013 James
When I worked in a steel mill long ago we used big wrenches on big machinery. Millwrights often use wrenches this large and even larger. We once fabricated a wrench 6" across to tighten the nuts on large anchor bolts.
5/3/2013 David
Could they be for 80mm and 90mm nuts?
5/3/2013 Dan
Hi, the very large Armstrong and Williams open end wrenches, looking at the old Armstrong and Williams catalogs, they listed a wide range of sizes including very large ones like these with no particular uses mentioned. Large tools like this were typically used in railroad shops, oil field work, bridge construction, power plants and similar applications. Hope to visit the museum one of these days.
 
TLC0044b  

This is a very large open end combination wrench made by Armstrong.
The open end sizes are 3 5/8” and 3 3/16”, with a overall length of 37 inches.

Can anyone tell us what these tools are used for?

Positively Identified

5/2/2013 Ed
Locomotives
5/2/2013 James
When I worked in a steel mill long ago we used big wrenches on big machinery. Millwrights often use wrenches this large and even larger. We once fabricated a wrench 6" across to tighten the nuts on large anchor bolts.
5/3/2013 David
Could they be for 80mm and 90mm nuts?
5/3/2013 Dan
Hi, the very large Armstrong and Williams open end wrenches, looking at the old Armstrong and Williams catalogs, they listed a wide range of sizes including very large ones like these with no particular uses mentioned. Large tools like this were typically used in railroad shops, oil field work, bridge construction, power plants and similar applications. Hope to visit the museum one of these days.
 
TLC0043  

This pliers type tool was made by Grayson Tool Co. of Hastings Nebraska.
They are  81/2 inches long, with a loop on each tine.

Does anyone know what this tool is used for?

Positively Identified

4/18/2013 Greg
A little research revealed that Hasting,NE, is where Kool Aid was invented.  I can't figure out how these pliers would be used with Kool Aid however.
6/18/2013 "Bus"
This is a piston ring compressor minus the compressing band, Patent No. 1805543 was granted May 19, 1931 to Ludwig B. Glantz of Minden, Nebraska.
The same tool can be found marked "Glantz Mfg.. Co. Minden, Neb."
 
TLC0042  

This tool is one tenth of an inch, (.1) thick stamped steel.
It measures 7 1/4"Long by 2"Wide.
The U-shaped opening has round openings at the end of each leg, about 3/8"Deep spaced 7/8" apart.
This tool is quite strong and shows signs of bending.

Can someone identify this tool?

4/5/2013 Greg
This tool reminds me of user made straightening tools from aircraft factories.  Aircraft parts are often made from oddly shaped extrusions .  The extrusions are difficult to straighten without altering their configuration. In the case of this tool, it would be used on a channel with an interior lip.  The extrusion would be slid into the tool and held while the straightener mechanic brought the part into tolerance.  BTW, those straighteners always had massive forearms from doing their jobs.
4/5/2013 Kenny
I have seen this type of "latch" on barn doors. It looks like a type of "hasp" to latch closed a door. It might not be a tool, but a door closure.  Just an idea.
4/5/2013 Ken
Wow!  Could it be a tool to twist wire to tighten the fence line of a bracing post or even to tighten a wire that has broken  by using a separate  looped wire  to pull the broken wire tight after the broken wire was had each end twisted to form a loop???
4/7/2013 Bob
It's a piece of scrap sheetmetal from which the letter "C" was stamped.
4/18/2013 Greg
Bob, you stated that this could be a scrap of sheet metal from which a "C" had been stamped.  Those pieces of scrap are referred to as "skeletons" in the aircraft industry.
 
TLC0041  

This pliers type tool is made of cast iron with harden steel jaws.
The tool is 8" long. There is a patent date for June-30-03, but no name is present.

Positively Identified

2/4/2013 Ken
I've never seen that tool, but the jaws look like the tool used when they used metal ear tags on cattle. It crushed the end after being put thru the cows ear.
2/4/2013 Dave
The jaw design looks to fit a "clip" used to lock two pieces of wire together in seat base spring units.  I struggled with these clips when repairing seats for trucks, as I had to use regular pliers for lack of such a tool as TLC0041
2/4/2013 Bus
I think the patent for TLC0041 is US Patent No. 732501 issued to William J. Baker of Southgate, KY. Patent is titled PLIERS FOR CLAMPING CLIPS ON WIRES 
2/5/2013 Ed
It looks similar to a tool we used to remove the shoes off our work horses when we re-shod them.   First you would scrape the hard dirt and crap out of the hooves frog, (the center soft part of the hoof).  Then , using a tool such as this one, you would grasp the head of the hoof nail and roll the pliers so as to extract the nails. Then, I seem to remember  the tool also was used to clip the broken edges off of the hoof. 
Then a heavy file, like a wood rasp was used to smooth out the edges of the hoof and the flat bottom where the new shoe was to be nailed.  We had our own blacksmith shop on the ranch and so we could size the shoes to each individual horse by heating them to cherry red hot in our coal and bellows pit.  After cooling the shoes in oil we would I place the shoe on the horses hoof and secure it with six nails, hammered through the shoe into the hoof with about half an inch of the nail bent over and around the outside of the hoof. All this while being bent over, against the horse with his leg and hoof held between your knees so you could work on him.  The worst ones were the mules.  The bastards would bite or kick anyone they could reach, and I had my share of bruises from the four we ran with the horses. Well, there you are Ed, I might be wrong about this tool but now you are a qualified "ferrier."  from Ed's friend Don
 
TLC0040  
This tool is a stamped, combination wrench that is 6 inches long. It has 5/16, 7/16, 1/2, 9/16, and 13/16 openings, with a screw driver on one end.

It also has a spark plug gap gage @ .032, under the gage there is a compartment that has a solid brass pin and brass cotter pin.

Positively Identified

1/3/2013 Floyd
It is a multipurpose wrench made for use around older outboard motors. you are correct about the the spark plug feeler gage. the round piece of brass is the shear pin for the prop! I have yet seen anyone identifiy what out board motor it came with.
1/3/2013 John
Wrench TLC0040 in the "What is it Tool" is a wrench that accompanied outboard boat motors made by Scott-Atwater. The pivoting cover is a spark plug gap gauge, and the compartment held shear pins for the prop. Hope this helps, and Thanks for the great site!
1/6/2013 Rick
I have collected a few old tools over the years.I believe the wrench shown was a wrench that came with some vintage tractors.
 
TLC0039  

This tool is a combination style tool. It is 6 inches long and 3 ½ inches wide.

The bottom end has a 1/2 inch hex socket.

The top end has a 5/16 inch square socket cast on one end, and on the other is a screw driver/ prying wedge.

Cast into the handle on one side is Vissering & Co. Chicago, on the other side is cast  Air Nozzle Wrench.

Can anyone share some information on this tool?

 
 
TLC0038  

This tool is eleven inches long and has no identification marks anywhere on the tool.

Can anyone identify this tool?

11/17/2012 Noel
I think it is a tool to hold a splined shaft in order to remove a retaining nut.
11/17/2012 Mike
It looks like a wrench used to open old oil cans. Just a wild guess.
11/18/2012 Bob
There are washers that have teeth similar to the indents on this wrench...could it be used to hold one in place for some reason?
11/18/2012 David
Appears to be used for assembling gears in a gearbox or possibly rotating a splined shaft to align it with a hole.  The splined shaft seems less likely since most splined shaft designs would leave the tool unable to disengage after assembly.
 
TLC0037  

     This is a pliers type tool that is spring loaded compound action that could squeeze and put a notch in maybe banding material. It has C-601 stamped on it..

Positively Identified

4/26/2013 Missouri Valley Wrench Club, March 2013 page 10
It is a cotter pin removal tool
 
TLC0036  

     This tool is 4 1/2" long and 1 3/4" wide, it is made of cast brass and has 11380A cast into it.

Do you know what this tool is used for?

 
 
TLC0035  

     This tool is 9" long and it has "OTC" stamped on it.

 Do you know what this tool is used for?

 
 
TLC0034  

     This tool is 12 1/2" long, has a wood handle. One side has Lewis Cross Bar forged steel stamped on it, and the other side has 41/2" forged steel stamped on it. Also has a spring loaded arm with 1/2" nut attached.

Do you know what this tool was used for?

Positively Identified

6/172013 Kirk
The Lewis Cross Bar Vulcanizer was a technique used by dentists to create fitted dentures from rubber plates in the very early 1900's. This is the handle from the top of the machine.
 
TLC0033  

     This combination wrench is 4/12" long, has a 3/4" open end and 7/8" opening in the center. Also has 1/2" square opening at one end.  The no. 285 is cast into it.

What is this tool made for?

9/16/2012 Clark
Could the combination wrench possibly be used for spark plugs on a Model A or T, the spark plugs were pretty big like 3/4" in size. just my thought
 
TLC0032  
     Pliers type tool 7 1/4"  long. Has Harper 72 stamped into one handle, and 1260 stamped into the other handle. The jaws are flat and crimp thin flat material to a taper of 1/2" at the back of the jaw and 9/16" at the front of the jaw.

Do you know what this tool was used for? 
 
 
TLC0031  

     This pair of diagonal wire cutters is 13 1/2" long, made in Brockton Mass. Has long curved handles.

Can you identify this tool?

Positively Identified

8/15/2012 Jim
We used this type in a shoe store to pull out lasting tacks that were in shoes.  I don't know if that was the original use but they did work for that purpose.
 
TLC0030  
     This tool has a 9/16" hex socket fixed on a "u" shaped handle and has “Superior-Bog Quality” stamped on the handle.

Can you identify this tool?
7/24/2015 David
TLC0030 Appears to be a variant of a tire iron. The U-bend allows the user to step on the handle to further tighten the lugnut without causing radial torque which might cause it to slip off the nut
 
TLC0029  

     This tool is cast (steel) and is much like TLC0028, with a five sided socket cast into it the same size as TLC0028. 

Positively Identified

8/6/2012 David
There isn't a good indication of scale in the pictures, but those look like fire-hydrant wrenches. TLC0028 might be doing dual duty as a chipping hammer.  Maybe it's for chipping through multiple fire hydrant repaintings to open a fire hydrant that hasn't been opened in decades.
8/6/2012 Noel
Most 5-sided tools like those were for fire hydrants.
8/6/2012 Ed
These wrenches have to be to access electric utility vaults, or fire hydrants. That’s the only place you’ll fine penta-head bolts.
8/6/2012 Dan M.
The tools are used to remove/replace the 5 sided bolt which holds a cover over a shut off valve in the ground for shutting off the main water supply to many homes or businesses. It is usually referred to as a Buffalo Box. The 5 sided size bolt was a tamper proof item to keep most people from turning back on their water after a municipality had turned it off for non payment.
8/6/2012 Monty
The tool on the left (TLC0028) is a chipping hammer and wrench to turn off and on oxy accetlyne tanks for cutting steel.  The tool on the right (TLC0029) is same thing but just turns on or off the bottles.
8/7/2012 Ken
They came with large wood stoves; some air vents had bolts to open and close. The vents down at the ash door were slides, so the point was used to push the vent open or closed. A tap with the hammer would get the door to slide when hot. I still use one like the photo on the right (TLC0029).  Even the early gas heaters used something like the one on the left (TLC0028).  When I worked at Yellowstone, the modern 1930s heater and cook stoves had these tools hanging on the wall, but with longer handles than the one on the left (TLC0028).
8/7/2012 Neal
Fire hydrants require 5 sided wrenches. Any I have seen had longer handles for more leverage though.
8/7/2012 Danny Ray
Mueller is still in business today manufacturing everything from small shut off water valves to large city water hydrants. Their 2007 catalog, page 7.28 Curb Boxes-Optional Equipment, has the ductile iron version of TLC0028 listed as H-10323 Pentagon Key. This tool is used for operating the screws of Mueller and Buffalo type curb boxes or repair lids. One end is pointed for digging ice or dirt away from lid of box. The other end is a hammer head. Fits standard water works pentagon.
8/8/2012 Dan C.
Hi, the 5 sided sockets, these are usually for hydrants, as with this shape it is difficult to turn the hydrant lug with a regular wrench.
8/20/2012 Floyd
It is the wrench used by meter readers to unscrew the in ground lids on very old style manhole covers. one was even marked "FORD"
 
TLC0028  

     This tool is cast ( in bronze ) with Mueller on one side, and the word "Steel" cast into the other side of the handle. It has a five sided socket cast into it that measures 7/8" at the wide point and 5/8" at the narrowest point.

Positively Identified

8/6/2012 David
There isn't a good indication of scale in the pictures, but those look like fire-hydrant wrenches. TLC0028 might be doing dual duty as a chipping hammer.  Maybe it's for chipping through multiple fire hydrant repaintings to open a fire hydrant that hasn't been opened in decades.
8/6/2012 Noel
Most 5-sided tools like those were for fire hydrants.
8/6/2012 Ed
These wrenches have to be to access electric utility vaults, or fire hydrants. That’s the only place you’ll fine penta-head bolts.
8/6/2012 Dan M.
The tools are used to remove/replace the 5 sided bolt which holds a cover over a shut off valve in the ground for shutting off the main water supply to many homes or businesses. It is usually referred to as a Buffalo Box. The 5 sided size bolt was a tamper proof item to keep most people from turning back on their water after a municipality had turned it off for non payment.
8/6/2012 Monty
The tool on the left (TLC0028) is a chipping hammer and wrench to turn off and on oxy accetlyne tanks for cutting steel.  The tool on the right (TLC0029) is same thing but just turns on or off the bottles.
8/7/2012 Ken
They came with large wood stoves; some air vents had bolts to open and close. The vents down at the ash door were slides, so the point was used to push the vent open or closed. A tap with the hammer would get the door to slide when hot. I still use one like the photo on the right (TLC0029).  Even the early gas heaters used something like the one on the left (TLC0028).  When I worked at Yellowstone, the modern 1930s heater and cook stoves had these tools hanging on the wall, but with longer handles than the one on the left (TLC0028).
8/7/2012 Neal
Fire hydrants require 5 sided wrenches. Any I have seen had longer handles for more leverage though.
8/7/2012 Danny Ray
Mueller is still in business today manufacturing everything from small shut off water valves to large city water hydrants. Their 2007 catalog, page 7.28 Curb Boxes-Optional Equipment, has the ductile iron version of TLC0028 listed as H-10323 Pentagon Key. This tool is used for operating the screws of Mueller and Buffalo type curb boxes or repair lids. One end is pointed for digging ice or dirt away from lid of box. The other end is a hammer head. Fits standard water works pentagon.
8/8/2012 Dan C.
Hi, the 5 sided sockets, these are usually for hydrants, as with this shape it is difficult to turn the hydrant lug with a regular wrench.
8/20/2012 Floyd
It is the wrench used by meter readers to unscrew the in ground lids on very old style manhole covers. one was even marked "FORD"
 
TLC0027  

This tool is 14 inches long and the curved hook is 4" across. Does anyone have an idea what this tool was used for ?

Positively Identified

8/6/2012 Donn
Maybe TLC0027 is a "Olympic Star Hook" made expressly for pulling Michael Phelps out of a London swimming pool after he's fallen-in with several hundred Gold & Bronze medals around his neck, holding him at the bottom??
8/28/2012 BATM Docents
We have a positive ID on tool TLC0027,  it is a reef hook, used for caulking, and plumbing.
 
TLC0026  

Small pair of pliers, 5 inches long, with a unique jaw design. Can anyone share info about this tool?

8/6/2012 Donn
My best gesstimate on item TLC0026 (Pliers) would be: "Hog Ring Pliers" used to place / install / crimp those little copper plated steel Hog Rings into swine ears for showing hogs or commercially grown hog, stock numbers.
8/12/2012 William
TLC0026  appears to be something that that an old time blacksmith would have used to pull horseshoes and the nails that held them. The curved handle would have made the tool identifiable by hand in the tool belt while the blacksmith was holding the horses foot up and thereby easily grasped in the right position for the job to be done without having to actually look at it and take attention away from the horse. The straight part of the handle would have been a type of pry bar perhaps with a well worn point that would have given the blacksmith a cleaner place to have place the flat part of the mouth which was also a pry bar with greater leverage in the actual mouth of the tool to then bring the pressure of the curved part of the mouth to pull the nails of and the horseshoe itself from the hoof. A blacksmith is pretty much limited by the tools he can actually use because his attention must be focus on the horse in order not to be kicked by the horse. and since a blacksmith is a blacksmith he may well have made this tool by himself by hand.
  I am a carpenter but having grown up in Detroit I do have a fascination with blacksmithing which nowadays is known as metal fabrication. Blacksmithing is a foundation block of manufacturing. Making the tools that make the stuff. Henry Ford kept a crew of old time blacksmiths on staff of his state of the art River Rouge Plant just so he could their opinion on the viability of the things he was working on.
7/8/2013 Philip
This is a watchmakers tool.